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Indian brides sit for a group photo before a mass wedding hosted by a diamond trader in Surat, India, yesterday. 151 young couples tied the knot at the mass wedding hosted by Indian diamond trader Mahesh Savani, who has been funding the weddings of fatherless women in the city of Surat for several years. Weddings in India are expensive affairs with the bride’s family traditionally expected to pay the groom a large dowry of cash and gifts. Hundreds of people, mostly family members and neighbors of the couple, are hosted at lavish meals over a number of days adding to the costs. — AP photos
Indian brides sit for a group photo before a mass wedding hosted by a diamond trader in Surat, India, yesterday. 151 young couples tied the knot at the mass wedding hosted by Indian diamond trader Mahesh Savani, who has been funding the weddings of fatherless women in the city of Surat for several years. Weddings in India are expensive affairs with the bride’s family traditionally expected to pay the groom a large dowry of cash and gifts. Hundreds of people, mostly family members and neighbors of the couple, are hosted at lavish meals over a number of days adding to the costs. — AP photos
Indian businessman hosts wedding for 151 couples
Irish musician Hozier has said he would consider striking over the threat artificial intelligence (AI) poses to his industry.

Hollywood actors and writers are currently striking over a row about better contracts and protection from the use of AI.

Hozier told the BBC's Newsnight he would be willing to join similar strike action in the music industry.

The singer added he was not sure if AI "meets the definition of art".

In July, Hollywood writers and actors manned picket lines for the first time in decades. Among their concerns was a proposal by the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers to keep "digital replicas" of actors.

But musicians are yet to follow suit regarding the threat AI poses to their own industry. The technology could be used to write songs or mimic well-known artists.

In April, a song that used AI to clone the voices of Drake and The Weeknd was removed from streaming services following criticism that it violated copyright law.

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Asked if he could imagine going on strike over the threat AI poses to music, Hozier, whose real name is Andrew John Hozier-Byrne, said: "Joining in solidarity if there was… action on that? Absolutely."

"Whether [AI is] art or not, I think, is nearly a philosophical debate," the Grammy-nominated singer, well known for his song Take Me to Church, told presenter Victoria Derbyshire.

"It can't create something based on a human experience. So I don't know if it meets the definition of art."

Last week, the Financial Times reported that Google and Universal Music are in talks to license artists' melodies and voices for songs generated by AI.

During his interview, Hozier also discussed the death of fellow Irish singer-songwriter Sinéad O'Connor.

The singer reflected that he was "walking on this road that she paved", after she ripped up a picture of the Pope on US TV in 1992, in protest against child sexual abuse in the Catholic Church.

Her actions initially drew widespread condemnation.

Three decades later, Hozier's debut single Take Me to Church, which he said criticised the church's teaching of "shame about sexual orientation", reached number one in 12 countries and remains the 30th most streamed song of all time.

"I think sensibilities have changed," Hozier said of the difference in reaction. "I think part of it is because Sinead was a woman. I think a lot of it is she was one of the first who had that courage to stand up and say it.

"That was such a taboo at the time."

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